A Vancouver man who bought two tickets to Sunday’s USA vs. Canada hockey match, but didn’t receive the tickets he wanted, is suing a...

A Vancouver man who bought two tickets to Sunday’s USA vs. Canada hockey match, but didn’t receive the tickets he wanted, is suing a Vancouver ticket broker for $60,000.

Patrick O’Brien filed the lawsuit against Allstar Tickets last week in a Canadian court before the game, because he claimed the company did not deliver the two center-ice tickets he paid $4,600 for.

O’Brien claimed that finding two replacement center-ice tickets to the game, some of the most sought-after of the Vancouver Olympics, would have cost $60,000, according to CBC News. O’Brien was refunded his money but sued anyway.

Allstar Tickets, which reportedly did not deny having the tickets, declined to honor the purchase because, as a way of protecting itself, required O’Brien to provide photocopies of the credit card used and a valid ID before it would process the order. For ticket sales of more than $1,000, the company demands customers provide that information in an effort to avoid possible fraud. Despite multiple requests via phone and email, O’Brien reportedly never provided the information.

“In this industry you can get a lot of people doing fraudulent ticket buys online, and we want to protect our customers as well as ourselves,” Allstar Tickets President Scott Ayre told CBC News.

In a separate incident last month, only a couple of weeks before the start of the Vancouver Olympics, scandal struck when major brokers and hundreds of customers were left without tickets after Atlanta, GA-based ticket company Action Seating was allegedly cheated out of thousands of tickets in a suspected fraud case. Action Seating was reportedly responsible for providing the tickets to the brokers, which had taken orders for the inventory.