In a move to distinguish itself from rival ticketing companies, primary ticketer TicketBiscuit is launching an all-in ticket pricing model for an upcoming concert...

In a move to distinguish itself from rival ticketing companies, primary ticketer TicketBiscuit is launching an all-in ticket pricing model for an upcoming concert by the band Guster at Birmingham, AL’s WorkPlay entertainment complex.

A ticket for the April 4 show will cost a flat $25 no matter where you buy it, whether online, at the box office or over the phone. No other fees will be applied, and the decision to implement the all-in pricing plan was mutually reached between TicketBiscuit, WorkPlay and Guster. Day of the show, a ticket will carry the all-in price of $27.

“The collaboration of a ticketing company, a venue, and an artist to arrive at a fair price represents a new way of making live entertainment a more pleasurable experience for the fans,” Jeff Gale, CEO of TicketBiscuit, said in a statement.

Added-on ticket fees have been a part of live entertainment for decades, but the practices has aggravated fans for just as long. For some shows, various fees can almost double the face value of tickets.

All-in pricing is nothing new. Some countries in Europe have required all-in pricing models for years, and in 2008, prior to its merger with Live Nation, Ticketmaster experimented with all-in pricing for some shows by The Eagles. Other ticketing companies have used the model, too, and after Ticketmaster’s experiment, Live Nation began folding in or removing some fees for other shows. In addition, the company is considering using all-in pricing for many — if not all — tours starting this year.

Yet, TicketBiscuit claims its model is different. Some of Ticketmaster’s and Live Nation’s all-in tickets still contained other fees, such as delivery fees, while TicketBiscuit’s will not. To drive home the point, TicketBiscuit has set up a new Web site, AllInPrice.org, designed to foster a grassroots movement toward industry wide acceptance of the model.

“The process was pretty easy, it just required clear and open communication among all parties, and a bit of willingness to deviate from the way things have always been done,” Todd Coder, director of Business Development for TicketBiscuit, said in a statement. “A lot of credit goes to WorkPlay and Guster for helping us make this happen.”