Ticketometer takes live events ticketing to the people Ticketometer takes live events ticketing to the people
Ticketometer.com, based in Houston, TX, is preparing to take innovative concepts in ticketing and event planning online, by inviting artists, promoters and venues to... Ticketometer takes live events ticketing to the people

Ticketometer.com, based in Houston, TX, is preparing to take innovative concepts in ticketing and event planning online, by inviting artists, promoters and venues to propose an event on the company’s website.

The show is “created” on the site as if it is an actual event, including details on the date and time of the show, any age requirements, and ticket prices. In addition, the client specifies a minimum number of tickets which must be sold, à la Groupon or the new GrouponLive, for the deal to take place. The difference here is that the event does not exist until a minimum number of fans express interest in buying tickets. Promoting the potential event on social media sites, the client directs fans to Ticketometer to log their interest, and when that specified minimum number of fans has spoken, the event is confirmed and the tickets are charged to their accounts.

If a venue is not yet involved in the deal, the artist or promoter must then book one, and if the deal falls through, ticket purchasers will be refunded. No contracts are required for any part of the process.

Theoretically, the model should work for all parties. First, artists or promoters will be less likely to play to empty houses, and they will be able to book venues in a stronger position, able to present news of presold tickets to the venue they hope to book. Second, venues will be booked with a number of tickets already bought, increasing their confidence in a full house as well as potential for auxiliary spending at the event. And finally, fans get discounted tickets and a little bit of a say in who gets to play in their towns.

The company will generate revenue by charging clients a service fee on top of the ticket price, with the client still receiving all ticket proceeds collected.

Co-founded by Jaron and Ardon Lukasiewicz, the company was launched in beta just two weeks ago and should launch officially by summer’s end. In a recent conversation with TicketNews, Jaron Lukasiewicz talked about the particular strengths of this new model for event planning and ticketing: “This benefits venues…Many shows that reach the setoff point close to the show date will play at smaller venues, and larger venues can fill their rooms on less popular nights of the week.

“Another important aspect of Ticketometer is that people can use it to create competitions between cities that are fun for fans and help artists optimize their tour schedule. At the very basic level, you can pit two cities against each other, Houston and Dallas for example…first to reach the setoff point wins the show! You can also pit multiple cities against each other to focus your tour on cities with the most demonstrated fan interest.

Ultimately, the company aims to change the way industry professionals think about booking and selling tickets for events. Says Lukasiewicz, “Right now we are one hundred percent focused on making the Ticketometer concept the ‘industry norm’. No, it’s not for every ticketing circumstance, but we believe we can add huge value to certain shows and all tours.”

And while the company’s current focus is on developing relationships with artists, venues and promoters, Lukasiewicz is not ruling out future collaborations with ticket brokers.

In recent weeks, Lukasiewicz has seen signs that the company is just about to make its first moves in the market: “The initial reaction from some key industry players has surpassed our expectations. We have some artists lined up to use Ticketometer, which you will see in the next couple of months.”