Is Google Chrome Autofill Technically a Bot in New York? Is Google Chrome Autofill Technically a Bot in New York?
New York’s new anti-bot legislation redefined a bot, or “ticket purchasing software” as “any machine, device, computer program or computer software that on its... Is Google Chrome Autofill Technically a Bot in New York?

New York’s new anti-bot legislation redefined a bot, or “ticket purchasing software” as “any machine, device, computer program or computer software that on its own or with human assistance, bypasses security measures or access control systems on a retail ticket purchasing platform, or other controls or measures on a retail ticket purchasing platform that assist in implementing a limit on the number of tickets that can be purchased, to purchase tickets.”

All browsers come with a feature called autofill, which is a piece of software that remembers information and uses it to fill in data in an online form so that you do not have to type it again. Most users welcome access to this “shortcut” for completing forms, and use this feature often.

A liberal reading of the recently passed New York anti-bot legislation may make most ticket buyers who use the autofill feature run afoul of the new law and become outlaws. Using an autofill program to purchase tickets, and reselling those tickets for whatever reason could make you guilty of a class A misdemeanor.

Oftentimes, bills go through a rigorous process of public hearings and input from experts in the field before they eventually are passed. Senate bill 8123 did not. It was forced through both houses with many changes at the closing of the session. In New York, the definition of an illegal bot could be confusing, and may inspire some challenges to this bill as time goes on.

We reached out to New York Attorney General’s office for clarification, and have not received a response by publication.