When it comes to the National Football League, the term “hot preseason ticket” is usually a misnomer. There is little to no demand to...

When it comes to the National Football League, the term “hot preseason ticket” is usually a misnomer. There is little to no demand to see games for which owners charge fans regular season prices to watch starters play no more than a handful of series and to see dozens of unknown players take the field in the second half.

But with fans eager to see football again after the season was endangered during the nearly five-month lockout, some of the preseason games are popular targets on the resale market — for now, anyway.

According to StubHub.com, the most popular preseason ticket is for the annual tilt between the New York Giants and the New York Jets at the new Meadowlands Stadium, which is scheduled this year for Saturday, August 27. StubHub reported this week the average price for the game is $97 and that tickets range from $49 in the upper bowl of the stadium to $229 for a first row seat near the end zone.

However, Jason Berger of New York-based AllSeats.com has a bit of advice for fans who might be eager to see that game: Wait, because the supply and prices are likely to get better in the coming weeks.

The Giants, who are the “home team” for the exhibition contest, were the only NFL franchise that gave its season ticket holders the option of paying their bill after the lockout was resolved. As a result, many of the tickets to the August 27 game haven’t even been mailed out yet.

“A lot of people waited to purchase their tickets until after the lockout was over,” Berger told TicketNews. “I would say within the next week to 10 days, we’re going to see a large number of tickets being offered for sale and driving the prices down.”

Berger said he hasn’t fielded a lot of business yet for the Jets-Giants game because many casual fans aren’t yet in buying mode and might not even be aware games are about to begin. The preseason schedule begins Thursday, August 11.

“Football in general, it’s been a late start this season because of the lockout — we’re getting a little bit of interest on it, it’s definitely not as much as we have at this time in years past,” Berger said. “I think a lot of people may not actually know that football is going on. It was like one day the flag was dropped and now we’re on. A lot of people who are kind of the followers [of football], not the diehard fans, [and] say ‘Let me get some tickets for my husband or friend or bring my kids [to a game]’ — those kind of fans are not yet out and not yet buying.”