Why Did We Just Pay $180 For a $74.95 Ticket to See Pink in Utah? Why Did We Just Pay $180 For a $74.95 Ticket to See Pink in Utah?
Hopefully fans looking to catch some tickets to see Pink on her “Beautiful Trauma” tour stop in Salt Lake City are paying attention this... Why Did We Just Pay $180 For a $74.95 Ticket to See Pink in Utah?

Hopefully fans looking to catch some tickets to see Pink on her “Beautiful Trauma” tour stop in Salt Lake City are paying attention this week. There’s a block of tickets – two entire sections, apparently, which display a per-ticket price of $74.45 on the seat map. Only, when you click to add them to your cart, the amount doubles once you start to progress through the check-out process.

After a tip from a reader, we took a look at the concert in question, and sure enough – fans are seeing one price at the display, only to have it *poof* up to a $144.95 single ticket price.

We kept our receipts. Hopefully they’ll be willing to hear us out on a refund, because we went through and made the purchase, just to be certain it wasn’t a display glitch. Join us on the trip down the transaction path:

Pink Tickets Bug

Standard seats – Section 15 in the lower level. Sure, they’re side view, but at least they’re priced semi-reasonably. right?

Pink Beautiful Trauma

Hey, no additional charge for mobile delivery! Hope my phone battery is up to the challenge in May!

Pink Beautiful Trauma

The $74.45 plus fees price listed on page one seems to be a bit of an understatement. Then again, it’s not technically inaccurate, so far as you count the price doubling as a “fee”.

 

Pink Beautiful Trauma

We’re in! After only paying a 140% markup!

We took a look around other stops on this particular tour, and it would appear that only the Salt Lake City performance features this unfortunately dismal consumer experience in waiting. With luck, any individual who walked through the purchase process for whatever length of time this has been out there has been paying attention (and didn’t deliberately walk into the hefty charge just to prove that it was legit, as we did).

And if they did, hopefully they purchased that Event Ticket Insurance, because the Live Nation-owned ticketing operator in question isn’t exactly known for its prompt refunding.

Comments

comments

Sean Burns Editor

Sean Burns is the editor of TicketNews.com. He has served as a reporter, editor and website administrator since the early 2000s. He holds a BA in journalism from Loyola University and a MA in Liberal Arts from Johns Hopkins. He can be reached via email at [email protected]