Concert promoter AllGood Entertainment, Inc. is moving forward with a lawsuit that seeks to bar Michael Jackson from performing his 50-date residency at the...

Concert promoter AllGood Entertainment, Inc. is moving forward with a lawsuit that seeks to bar Michael Jackson from performing his 50-date residency at the O2 Arena in London. The New Jersey based company, operated by Patrick Allocco, claims Jackson and his manager, Frank Dileo, reneged on a contract for a one-off reunion concert with the other Jackson siblings.

Filed in federal district court in New York on June 10, the suit names Jackson, Dileo and residency promoter AEG Live as defendants. The nearly 20-page complaint alleges breach of contract and fraud, among other counts.

In addition to seeking an injunction against the London residency, AllGood is seeking compensation for at least $20 million in lost profits and reimbursement of expenses, as well as an additional minimum of $20 million in punitive damages.

In May, Allocco told TicketNews that he signed a contract with Dileo, operating on Jackson’s behalf, for a pay-per-view reunion concert with Jackson and his siblings to take place sometime in summer 2009. The contract included a non-competition clause barring Jackson from performing prior to or three months after the single day event, according to the New Jersey based promoter.

Even after signing into the 50-date residency with AEG Live, the suit alleges that Jackson personally reassured his interest in working with AllGood Entertainment upon completing his time in London. However, “When pressed to commit on a date, Jackson and Dileo both reneged,” said AllGood’s attorney Ira Meyerowitz, of the New York-based law firm Meyerowitz Jekielek PLLC, in a statement.

“This is a case where the little guy followed the rules and was pushed aside by industry giants AEG and the Jacksons for the promise of bigger money and movies,” Meyerowitz continued.

Wolfgang's Vault - Posters Jackson would have received at least a $24 million binder for the reunion performance with his family, according to the complaint. It has been estimated the star could earn approximately $50 million for his residency in London.

This is just the latest obstacle for Jackson, who has become an almost permanent fixture in London tabloids since announcing his “This Is It” concert series at the O2 Arena. Media reports have claimed the singer is unfit for his historic residency, though AEG Live president Randy Phillips has insisted the shows will go on as planned with Jackson’s complete cooperation.

The production has faced only one serious setback, when concerns about set-up and preparation pushed back the opening date by a week from July 8 to July 13. Four shows were affected in the scheduling change, though all were rescheduled.

Jackson’s residency is set to run through March 2010.