Add Oregon to the growing list of states that are looking to tweak existing, or in this case establish, ticket resale laws. Officials in...

Add Oregon to the growing list of states that are looking to tweak existing, or in this case establish, ticket resale laws.

Officials in the Beaver State have begun to discuss House Bill 2673, which calls on venues, promoters or ticket brokers to disclose the exact number of tickets they have available for a concert, show or sporting event.

The proposed law requires that both primary and secondary ticket sellers disclose:

“The total number of admission tickets for the entertainment event that are available for purchase by members of the general public and the total number of admission tickets that are not available for purchase by members of the general public; Every class, tier or level of admission ticket that is available for purchase by members of the general public, together with a description of the type of entry, seating location, services or other privileges associated with each class, tier or level; The total number of admission tickets in each class, tier or level that are available for purchase by members of the general public; and A description of the type of entry, seating location, services or other privileges associated with admission tickets that are not available for purchase by members of the general public.”



According to TicketNews’s exclusive 50-state compendium “Ticket Resale Laws”, Oregon currently does not have any laws governing ticket sales.

According to published reports, the proposed law is nicknamed the “Hannah Montana bill,” because Oregon, like several other states experienced problems with ticket sales two years ago for the popular alter-ego of tween singer Miley Cyrus.

Connecticut considered similar legislation last year that called for venues and promoters to release a minimum of 75 percent of the tickets available for an event.