Harry Connick Jr. marks his return to Broadway this summer with his own limited engagement concert series. Dubbed “Harry Connick Jr. in Concert on...

Harry Connick Jr. marks his return to Broadway this summer with his own limited engagement concert series.

Dubbed “Harry Connick Jr. in Concert on Broadway,” the production is scheduled for a total of 11 performances from July 15 through July 26. The 1,445-seat Neil Simon Theatre will host the special.

During the production’s two weeks in-house, Neil Simon Theatre will be dark for just one night, July 20. Sunday performances are scheduled for 7 p.m., while concerts booked Monday and Wednesday through Saturday have 8 p.m. showtimes attached.

Ticketing for the engagement is being handled through Ticketmaster.com. Public onsales begin May 4, with price levels set at $50 and $135 for each performance.

More performance details are available on Connick Jr.’s official Web site.

Though the summer special will be his first concert series in the theatre district, Connick Jr. already has made his mark on the Great White Way. He first dabbled in New York theatre when he scored the 2001 musical “Thou Shalt Not.” For that work, he received a Tony nomination for Best Original Score, despite the largely negative critical response to the production as a whole.

The song man made his Broadway stage debut five years later for the Roundabout Theatre Company’s 2006 revival of “The Pajama Game.” His turn as Sid Sorokin earned leading actor nominations from the Tony, Drama Desk and Outer Critics Circle Awards.

Neil Simon Theatre is located at 250 West 52nd Street in New York, NY. Most recently, the playhouse ran a revival of the musical “Ragtime,” which opened on November 15 and ran through January 10. Though attendance surged in the production’s final two weeks, the middle of its run was plagued by half-capacity audiences, according to box office reports from the Broadway League.

The theatre was also set to stage Andrew Lloyd Webber’s new “Phantom” sequel “Love Never Dies” at the end of the 2010 season. But the production’s Broadway debut has been pushed to spring 2011 due to travel restrictions placed on Webber following his treatment for prostate cancer, according to The New York Times. “Love Never Dies” is currently being staged in London’s West End.