Canadian university students take first place for ticketing app Canadian university students take first place for ticketing app
The goodnights app adds a new twist to the realm of paperless ticketing, focusing on the use of QR code scanning for purchasing tickets... Canadian university students take first place for ticketing app

The goodnights app adds a new twist to the realm of paperless ticketing, focusing on the use of QR code scanning for purchasing tickets to last minute events. The app works by allowing consumers to scan the QR code contained on a concert or event advertisement, which in turn brings up ticketing information for the event. Once presented with a list of available ticketing options for the event, the consumer may choose tickets and enter credit card information to purchase the tickets. The tickets are then sent to the consumer’s phone or mobile device to allow for paperless ticketing.

In terms of ticket resale potential, the seller need only email the QR code to the buyer and the tickets will transfer, thereby eliminating the need to mail tickets or to meet in person to exchange event tickets. According to Michael Moll, one of the app’s co-creators, tickets sold at above face value prices will see some of the ticket price be paid back to the event venue and talent. “The reason that ticket is going to that value is because of the artist, because of the venue, because of the event, not because of the scalpers,” Moll told the Vancouver Sun.

By finding a way to generate additional revenue for artists and venues through the secondary ticketing market, goodnights could be on the cutting edge of a new means for the entertainment business to deal with the often contentious realm of secondary ticketing.

Individuals who purchase tickets via goodnights also will not have to worry about forgetting their phone or mobile device at home and not being able to get into the event. Goodnights will supply a digital list of all event attendees to the venue, which will allow ticket holders to enter the event with only a driver’s license or other form of ID in the event that their phone battery dies prior to the event.

While the app is currently free for iPhone and Android users, goodnights will charge a service fee that is equal to 8% of the ticket’s price. Moll told the Vancouver Sun that the hope of the goodnights creative team is that the app will eventually expand to compete with ticketing giants such as Ticketmaster. However, while the app begins its roll-out, the group will be focusing on partnering with small and medium-sized venues that are not currently contracted with the big name ticketing agents.

Currently, goodnights is limited to Vancouver, but should its popularity grow, it is certain the app will begin to expand to additional cities. The goodnights team is continuing to develop and tweak the app, and Moll told the Vancouver Sun that the group is planning on creating a Web version of the app that will be available for Blackberry users.