The New Jersey State Assembly this week passed a bill that will make it easier for every day citizens to resell tickets over the...

The New Jersey State Assembly this week passed a bill that will make it easier for every day citizens to resell tickets over the internet. New Jersey is one of only a handful of states that currently has strict regulations regarding ticket resale.

The bill will allow for unlimited ticket prices for any ticket resold over the internet, as long as it was not sold by a ticket broker. The bill would not outlaw or make it illegal for brokers to resell tickets to various entertainment events, but it would place brokers at a disadvantage when it comes to setting the price for reselling tickets.

Under the proposed bill, no ticket broker would be able to resell tickets at more than 50 percent above face value. Such stipulations are seen unfairly singling out ticket brokers, according to Tom Patania, CEO of New Jersey-based Select a Ticket, who told TicketNews that the language of the bill seems to go against the apparent free market economy the bill claims to support.

Furthermore, Patania worries that the bill will hurt local business for ticket brokers. “Why would a New Jersey resident have to go to an internet website for some out of state company instead of dealing, as they have been, with the local brokers who reside and do business in this state?”

In a conversation with TicketNews, Assemblyman John Burzichelli, the bill’s sponsor, addressed the concerns raised by Patania, emphasizing that the bill will not drastically change the ticket market within New Jersey. “The bill simply makes legal the internet selling that always occurs,” offers Burzichelli, “The practice is already going on, so the bill won’t change anything drastically.”

Bruzichelli also said that he has been in talks with ticket brokers, and says that it is possible that the bill may be amended in the state Senate to include provisions for ticket brokers. Should such an event occur, Bruzichelli asserts that he “would support such amendments should the Senate impose them.”

The bill will now be sent to the New Jersey State Senate for further debate and voting.

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