Ticket buyers are well accustomed to the 2-dimensional, multicolored maps that stadiums and theaters offer their patrons as a guide to their seating options....

Ticket buyers are well accustomed to the 2-dimensional, multicolored maps that stadiums and theaters offer their patrons as a guide to their seating options. And although these maps are useful, their lack of depth ultimately inhibits fans because they are unable to see the views from their prospective seat. But the days of these outdated maps may soon be coming to an end, as companies such as Fanvenues.com look to incorporate 3-dimensional maps into the ticketing world.

Fanvenues is a product of Peekspy Pte Ltd., which was co-founded by Oliver Oxenham, Paymon Rasekhy and Wesley Oxenham. Peekspy creates 3-D environments for companies to embed into their Web sites, and works mostly with commercial sectors, such as real estate developers, resorts and shopping malls.

But because the three co-founders of Peekspy are such sports enthusiasts, they decided to bring their 3-D technology to the ticketing market.

Wesley Oxenham, chief operations officer of Fanvenues, believes their company will be a success for a number of reasons.

Firstly, their stadium maps are in 3-D.

“Most ticket sellers are still using 2-D maps today,” Oxenham told TicketNews. “For those who will allow for 2-D as well as 3-D views, we believe we will have a competitive edge on other ticket sellers.”

Another reason why Oxenham believes the company will succeed is the speed of their technology. Fanvenues currently features 45 venues from around the world. Interested users can go to their Web site and download their application for free.

“Users simply have to pick their section via a drop-down list and it’s done, their view opens in 3-D. It’s even faster than looking for a section number on a 2-D map with over 200 sections. They can also quickly share their seat view while inviting more friends via Facebook or Twitter.”

Oxenham also highlighted how easy their 3D environments are to integrate, saying, “It works like YouTube. Our customers simply have to create an account, copy and paste their chosen embed code on their Web site and it’s done.”

Lastly, Oxenham described how the company’s flexibility will help it stand out from the competition.

“Some venues often have multiple arrangements,” he said. “In the case of a concert venue, it may have up to 20 different arrangements. Since we have control over the original accurate model, we can quickly generate a new arrangement based on a new seat plan, and release it before the event.”