Braden Cox, one of the speakers at Ticket Summit 2010, is a policy consultant with NetChoice, a coalition of trade associations, eCommerce businesses, and...

Braden Cox, one of the speakers at Ticket Summit 2010, is a policy consultant with NetChoice, a coalition of trade associations, eCommerce businesses, and online consumers, all of whom share the goal of promoting convenience, choice and commerce on the Net. He took the time to answer a few questions for TicketNews, both to give a little insight into his own work with NetChoice, as well as his hopes and goals for Ticket Summit 2010.

Cox has a technology-related public policy and legal background, both of which serve him well in his role in NetChoice.

TicketNews: Could you give us a little background of how you got involved with NetChoice? Was there anything specific in your background that drew you to NetChoice and working with e-commerce?

Braden Cox: One of the major reasons I went to law school was the rise of the Internet. In the mid-90’s I could see how this new communications media would revolutionize law and society. The law was and in many instances still is ill-equipped to deal with online services. At NetChoice, I work to breakdown these legal barriers and to craft new public policies where needed.

TN: What do you see as challenges to the future of ticketing industry? How are you and NetChoice planning on working toward combating those challenges?

BC: Whenever I read about how “scalpers” are hurting consumers, I cringe. Usually these statements are made by people who have a vested interest in preserving their own profits, not helping consumers. Legislators will hear about the rare but high-profiled cases where ticket prices go through the roof, and assume that the market is anti-consumer. My constant challenge is to educate policymakers about the secondary tickets market, and the overall choice, convenience, and price benefits to consumers.

TN: Have you participated in past summits, and if so, what have your experiences been?

BC: New York 2010 will be my 4th Ticket Summit, and I’ve had nothing but great experiences.

TN: Can you give our readers some insight in what you are planning on discussing at Ticket Summit 2010?

BC: The legal and policy world moves quickly, so we’ll see what’s most pertinent in a few months. But in the past I’ve discussed how online ticket brokers can be impacted by changes in sales tax law. I’ve also discussed state legislative activity—which states have recently deregulated or liberalized their reselling laws, or which states are looking to regulate.

TN: Finally, are there any particular people/companies you are looking forward to hearing from/talking to at the upcoming Ticket Summit?

BC: All of them!