Promoter Faces Theft Charges After Kentucky Concert Debacle Promoter Faces Theft Charges After Kentucky Concert Debacle
The promoter for a Kentucky concert that was scheduled to feature David Allan Coe before falling apart is in police custody, facing charges ranging... Promoter Faces Theft Charges After Kentucky Concert Debacle

The promoter for a Kentucky concert that was scheduled to feature David Allan Coe before falling apart is in police custody, facing charges ranging from theft by deception to multiple motor vehicle violations, according to multiple local news outlets. About 1,000 fans were waiting at a show that never happened, despite the promoter continuing to sell tickets well after he had told the headliner they weren’t to perform.

Fans were enraged when a show planned for over the weekend at the Daviess County Fairgrounds saw the headliner and support act Confederate Railroad not play as planned. As details emerged, it became clear that David Allen Coe and his band were in town and ready to perform, but had been inexplicably turned away from the event by the promoter – who allegedly threatened to have them arrested if they didn’t leave.

Confederate Railroad posted on Facebook informing fans they missed the gig due to a broken down tour bus.

On Monday, authorities confirmed that Jason Giardina was in police custody, and charged with driving with no brake lights, no registration plates, no insurance, and operating on a suspended license. On Monday, charges including theft by deception over his having continued to sell tickets despite knowing that Coe was not going to perform. The local Lions Club, which rented the fairgrounds for the scheduled concert, told 14 News that he “seemed genuine,” but had given them a different name – “Buzz Casey”.

By the end of the day, fans were upset, acts and vendors went unpaid, and the local Lions Club was left with a “black eye” over the snafu.

“All of the fans deserve to get their money back,” said Kimberly Coe, who manages David Allen Coe’s touring. “He told us that he sold 500 VIP tickets. The T-shirts that were promised never got printed, the kegs ran out and they never got to see David play. These people bought a ticket and wanted what they paid for and that opportunity was taken. In my heart and mind, I will do everything that we can and see to it that they at least get the time with their hero. That time was taken from all of us. I want to be able to give back what was taken from them.”

Dave Clark Contributing Writer