Eventbrite Clients Express Anger Over Friday Outage Eventbrite Clients Express Anger Over Friday Outage
Eventbrite (NYSE: EB) saw a lengthy outage in service on Friday, impacting many clients and their ability to sell tickets, according to multiple outlets.... Eventbrite Clients Express Anger Over Friday Outage

Eventbrite (NYSE: EB) saw a lengthy outage in service on Friday, impacting many clients and their ability to sell tickets, according to multiple outlets. The outage was caused by a malfunction of a feed that populates events on sale in the Eventbrite system to individual venue websites, according to TheTicketingBusiness.com.

“On October 18, we experienced an issue which impacted the search functionality on Eventbrite.com, the Eventbrite consumer app, and event listings on Eventbrite-powered client websites,” a spokesperson told TheTicketingBusiness.

“Our site was unavailable for a subset of customers from around 11:30am PT, but was fully resolved as of 6:00pm PT. WE identified the source of the problem and restored service. We have no reason to believe there was a data or security impact, and we don’t expect further disruption as a result of this issue.”

It is unclear how much business the outage cost the company or its clients. Several websites were noted as displaying no events and therefore no tickets on sale throughout the outage.

Billboard’s coverage noted that the outage “angered dozens of clients, some of whom say they were made to switch to Eventbrite weeks ago after years on the Ticketfly platform.” Eventbrite purchased Ticketfly from Pandora in 2017, but has been in the process of retiring the brand and bringing Ticketfly clients to its core Eventbrite platform.

“This the last straw,” said one California promoter. “I didn’t like the new site they gave, I thought Eventbrite’s software was inferior to what I had with Ticketfly and now this outage has sidelined several on-sales scheduled for today. I am so over it.”

The outage is just the latest in a long string of bad press for the ticketing platform, which went public just over a year ago. Troubles with the migration of clients from Ticketfly have dogged the company, which is also in the process of suing the promoters of the Roxodus festival after the last-minute cancellation of that festival over the summer.

Stock prices have plummeted since the company’s IPO, hovering between $16-18 a share throughout the summer after trading between $25-35 for much of the fall and winter after going as high as $37 in September of 2018.

Dave Clark Contributing Writer

No comments so far.

Be first to leave comment below.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *