Denver Venue Promises Cancellation of “Fraudulent” Tickets for Tame Impala Show Denver Venue Promises Cancellation of “Fraudulent” Tickets for Tame Impala Show
A Denver concert venue wanted to take a different approach with ticketing for an upcoming Tame Impala show, but the idea backfired. Now, it... Denver Venue Promises Cancellation of “Fraudulent” Tickets for Tame Impala Show

A Denver concert venue wanted to take a different approach with ticketing for an upcoming Tame Impala show, but the idea backfired. Now, it wants to cancel fans’ “fraudulent” purchases on the secondary market.

Tame Impala, the psychedelic rock band fronted by Kevin Parker, is visiting the city on October 7 and 8 for shows at the Mission Ballroom on their extended North American tour. The new venue wanted to try a ticket lottery in order to avoid scalpers and bots, Chuck Morris, CEO of AEG Presents Rocky Mountain Region, said earlier this year. He described the lottery as a “random system where everyone gets an equal chance at a ticket.” However, when fans had the chance to vie for tickets this week, the show sold out in seconds.

The Mission Ballroom’s Facebook page became filled with people complaining about how they were unable to obtain tickets, or noting that tickets were now being resold on various secondary sites. Strasburg told The Denver Channel that the lottery system worked “too well” and stopped the lottery. He received numerous complaints about customers not having more control over buying tickets, so the Mission Fair Ticketing Reservation System has been shelved and will be reworked.

The venue posted that it would review orders and cancel “fraudulent purchases” for the Tame Impala shows.

“We recognize that the demand for tickets to Tame Impala’s shows at the Mission Ballroom significantly outstretched availability,” the venue said in a post. “We are currently reviewing all orders & cancelling all fraudulent purchases. We will advise within a few days when those cancelled ticket orders will be made back available to the public.”

Fans are now confused, as they had purchased legitimate tickets from secondary sites, which have no reason to be cancelled. Many are asking the venue how they will determine these “fraudulent purchases,” and are inquiring about the tickets that were marked up directly through AXS’s own resale program.

TicketNews reached out to the Mission Ballroom for clarification.

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Olivia Perreault Deputy Editor

Olivia Perreault is the Deputy Editor for TicketNews. She is a graduate of The University of Rhode Island and holds a BA in journalism. As an avid concert junkie, she's been to hundreds of concerts and freelances for multiple online publications, including her music blog, found at OliviaGPerreault.com. Reach Olivia via email at [email protected]

  • Pork

    August 13, 2019 #1 Author

    How can you cancel a fake ticket. These people so stupid

    Reply

  • Ray

    August 13, 2019 #2 Author

    Ppl from all over the world could have bought these up in seconds only to resell them for 3-4 times face value. Not right and this kind of scalping has to end.

    Reply

  • Ray

    August 13, 2019 #3 Author

    I moved here from a small midwestern town to be able to see shows like this and to sell out in less than a minute is insane. Make ppl stand in lines if necessary at the box office. I’d go there and wait like I always did in the 80s and 90s!

    Reply

    • Bob

      August 15, 2019 #4 Author

      It’s a scummy practice by bands, promoters,venues,Ticketmaster,AXS and many others that take a piece of the pie but are never happy, just have people line up the day of show and see how quickly it sells out !!

      Reply

  • Steve

    August 14, 2019 #5 Author

    High demand shows of this kind create an immediate arbitrage opportunity for whoever successfully purchased tickets via the lottery process. If you get your hands on a ticket for $50 and know there’s a market demand willing to pay $250 for it, it turns legitimate buyers into a momentary scalper.

    Reply

  • Joe

    August 14, 2019 #6 Author

    The bigger issue is the lack of consumer confidence a primary market that scalps its own tickets. Both AXS and Ticketmaster are holding out 100s of tickets to be sold as BS VIP or premium seats. Ticketmaster was alreafy busted in marking tickets as “resale” tickets before they were even sold.

    Reply

  • Bun

    August 15, 2019 #7 Author

    Let’s see how the market changes now it’s announced that StubHub is up for sale. I wonder if one of the primary ticketing platforms you mention is gonna snap up the largest secondary marketplace.

    Reply

  • Jeff

    August 15, 2019 #8 Author

    All non-transferable tickets should be able to be cancelled and customer get a full refund upon customer cancellation request. If I can’t make it to the event, why should I lose my money, instead of reselling it.

    If the promoter doesn’t sell enough tickets for a show, don’t they cancel the show?

    Reply

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