Springsteen Fans Lament Broadway Process; Offer Organs to Pay for Tickets Springsteen Fans Lament Broadway Process; Offer Organs to Pay for Tickets
The allegedly final round of tickets went on sale for Springsteen on Broadway, and once again, it was a bloodbath for fans, as high... Springsteen Fans Lament Broadway Process; Offer Organs to Pay for Tickets

The allegedly final round of tickets went on sale for Springsteen on Broadway, and once again, it was a bloodbath for fans, as high prices and hurt feelings dominated the process, while promoters once again cashed in on the highest price tickets in Broadway history.

The latest extension by Bruce Springsteen was the third addition since the performance debuted in October of last year, with 81 new dates through December at the Walter Kerr Theatre in New York City. If, as has been reported, it is the final extension of the intimate show, the final number of performances will be 236 after the final date on December 16.

Due to the high demand,  only “Verified Fans” who previously registered for the show received an invitation to purchase tickets through Ticketmaster’s data harvesting system. Last week, those eligible were entered in a digital lottery through Lucky Seat. Then, it all came down to luck – plus how much money you can afford on a Broadway show.

Fans who once again got cold-shouldered in the code distribution process were outraged, feeling as though they weren’t deemed good enough fans to get a ticket to the show, and those that were successful in the lottery weren’t that happy either. Buyers were split into different time slots, and those who luckily scored tickets early were able to buy cheap (relatively speaking) seats, while others were left paying $400 and over per ticket.

Fans took to Twitter, expressing their dismay in light of the ticketing lottery. Most did not receive tickets, even with a code.

 

 

Then, those that did score tickets weren’t too excited about the cash they just blew – joking about selling body parts to get their money back. Another fan was able to get through the Ticketmaster lottery with a code, but had to turn down the tickets due to the large price tag.

 

 

“If we don’t see a tour with a reasonable (“reasonable”) price tag in the $100-$150 range, and/or a new album you can get for 12 bucks, at some point soon, fan grumbling may reach deafening proportions,” a writer at the Taunton Daily Gazette said.

Springsteen’s Broadway run will continue through this December in NYC. Those who weren’t deemed worthy of receiving a code, or those who couldn’t even enter because they missed the original registration period in the fall, can visit Ticket Club to find tickets to see Springsteen on Broadway.